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“Peach-boshi” (Part 2) by Cynthia Briscoe

“Peach-boshi” (Part 2) by Cynthia Briscoe In a previous post, we discussed the idea of substituting green peaches to replace the ume fruit traditionally used to make umeboshi. Not too many folks have an ume tree growing in their yard, but they might have access to an apricot tree or a peach tree. A few Japanese-specific grocers may sell fresh ume fruit in June, but again, this proves to be an exceptional find and is most likely not organic. When David and I lived in Kansas City, I ordered three ume trees from a nursery in Washington. The Midwest is actually not conducive to growing ume, but in my youthful enthusiasm, I planted them regardless. The trees will live, but very rarely do they bear fruit. Late frosts, common to the region, freeze the blossoms and consequently, no fruit will be produced that year. I found a good rule of thumb before planting an ume tree is to find out whether apricots grow locally, since apricots are the closest relative to ume. Also check with your Agricultural Extension Service concerning the growing success for apricots. Much to my chagrin, I discovered that in Kansas City, apricot trees bear fruit once every 7 to 11 years! So much for growing and making my own umeboshi in Kansas!  Perhaps though, if I had been more creative, I could have made “peach-boshi”. Here in California, our ume tree blooms in January. Our peach tree blooms later in the spring. It has never failed to produce fruit, but even here, the ume blossoms sometimes receive frost. Often the ume blossom time here corresponds with many solid days of rain, making it impossible for the bees to get out and pollinate. Due to my love of summer peaches, it seems a little sacrilegious to pick all the peaches green.  So I plan to pick some of the peaches while they are still green to make “peach-boshi”, and leave the rest to mature and ripen.  Then I can enjoy “peach-boshi” and fresh sweet peaches, too! Another necessary component in making umeboshi or “peach-boshi” is an herb called shiso. Shiso is also known as perilla or beefsteak. The purple shiso is the variety used to impart the red color to umeboshi. Shiso is very rich in iron and calcium. It also boasts anti-bacterial properties. Traditionally, fresh shiso leaves are served as a garnish with sushi containing raw fish, as it protects against fish poisoning, just in case the fish is tainted.      Shiso is easy to grow your own shiso in any...

Simple Qigong Exercise For Cooling Down

http://www.macroamerica.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Balance-Summer-Heat-with-Qi-Gong-for-the-Heart.mp4 This simple qigong exercise can be done at home. It’s can cool down an over-heated heart on a hot...

How To Begin Macrobiotics

Through macrobiotics you can take daily steps to transform your life into a celebration and an adventure, doing what you want to do, on a stable foundation of physical health and mental clarity. For the one who really wants an adventurous life, macrobiotics awaits you. There are five steps we want to suggest as follows: 1. Study macrobiotic principles to see if they make sense to you and if they are something you want to use freely and creatively in your own life. 2. Supply your kitchen with macrobiotic food. 3. Prepare macrobiotic meals daily. 4. Eat your macrobiotic meals with appreciation while also practicing good chewing. 5. Live the life you want, creatively, adventurously, with gusto and without hesitation, using macrobiotic principles as your guide. The above five are the foundation of a macrobiotic...

Australia Journal Update

We arrived in Melbourne on Sunday, June 20. What friendly people the Australians are! Our sponosor and friend, Susanna, fixed a wonderful macrobiotic meal for us. Macrobiotic food is so dlecious and full of life. How lucky we are! Best wishes to all, including our Facebook fans and other friends back home and around the world! Here’s a pic of Cynthia at the airport with our plane, that we were on fir 14 hrs(!), behind her....

Ira Briscoe Memorial

Ira Briscoe loved his young friends and wanted all the best for them. On August 14, 2004, Ira died from injuries received during an accident while with his parents, David and Cynthia, at The Kushi Macrobiotic Summer Conference in Vermont. At the young age of 18  Ira was already known as a true human being who was sought by his friends for advice on life, who inspired them to finish high school, and who was appreciated as a genuine friend who could be turned to in times of heartache or trouble without fear of betrayal or judgement. One night during the Summer Conference, Ira told his mother, “I’ve never felt more alive in my life.” He loved the new macrobiotic adventure he had found for himself, and he was looking forward to starting a campus macrobiotic program upon his return to California and his first year at California State University-Chico. Ira was always sharing his bounding enthusiasm for macrobiotics with his young friends, loaning them his books, inviting them for meals, and discussing with them his views on life and freedom that were transforming through his study of George Ohsawa’s writings and the writings of many others, including Henry David Thoreau. Ira’s generous spirit of hope for humanity inspires and energizes all that we do at Macrobiotics America. For the extraordinary blessing of his 18 yrs with us we are truly grateful. In his soaring life of the spirit now we cheer him on, our eyes wide with wonder at the beauty that is forever Ira. “May all beings and all the earth be healthy and happy.” The Briscoes:  David, Cynthia, Justin, Nora, Iris, Ana and...

Socially Engaged Macrobiotics

Personal responsibility for one’s health and life is essential to macrobiotic practice. We at Macrobiotics America also believe in being engaged with the wider world beyond our individual health concerns and personal daily life. We are an inseparable part of the whole of life, including the society and natural environment of the entire planet. It does not matter to us how others eat, what religion they embrace, what race they are, or what traditions they live by. We are all one human family, and when there is suffering in our family, we naturally respond. Our theories of what has caused the suffering or what will stop the suffering, doesn’t do much to alleviate the suffering right now, this moment. All that matters to us is that someone in our family is suffering. In order to respond to our human brothers and sisters in ways that compliment our teaching and sharing of macrobiotics, we at Macrobiotics America ask you to join us by involving yourself in local activities and programs that reach out to our common human family in its immediate moment of need. And/or you can join us in supporting the following organizations: The Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking National Center for Exploited and Missing Children International Justice Mission Hmong International Human Rights Watch Help for Homeless and Street Kids The beautiful and life-sustaining natural environment also needs our help and protection. Please consider getting involved in local environmental organizations and/or joining us in supporting the following: The Pew Center on Global Climate Change Climate.org Amber Waves: Safeguarding Our Food Supply Safeguard Organic Standards Food & Water Watch Please contact us with information about humanitarian and environmental causes for possible posting...

Macrobiotics America Study House

In the early days of macrobiotics in the USA, students studied in small groups at the home or “study house” of experienced teachers. It was a strong, personal and friendly atmosphere for learning. Many respected teachers and some of longest-practicing macrobiotic people in America today, received their macrobiotic foundation from the study-house style of learning. When macrobiotic schools with large classes opened in the 1970’s, study houses unfortunately disappeared. Recently, David & Cynthia Briscoe opened their home in the study house tradition, once more affording students this unique opportunity. Students from around the world come there to benefit from this legendary way of learning and developing a macrobiotic practice. The personal study-house way of learning is not presented in an institutional, medical, or fancy setting. It is in our humble, relaxed and welcoming home in a friendly, middle class neighborhood of Northern California. Students attending classes are in a small group of no more than 6, learning in down-to-earth, family-style surroundings. This opportunity for learning, in such a small group and in such a personal way, with David and Cynthia, macrobiotic teachers who have taught all over the world for more than 30 years, is a rare and unique offering. The Macrobiotics America Study House also hosts community gatherings, including monthly potlucks, “Ira Briscoe Memorial” Sponsored Classes for Young People, and serves as a macrobiotic resource for the surrounding community. Please come and visit...

Cynthia Briscoe

Cynthia Briscoe is one of America’s most respected macrobiotic cooking instructors. In 2012 she was honored by Michio Kushi and The Kushi Institute International with the prestigious Aveline Award. Her cooking is as delicious as it gets. She co-founded and co-directed The Macrobiotic Center of Kansas City during the 1980’s. Cynthia was the co-owner and head chef of The Amber Waves Café, the award-winning macrobiotic restaurant in Kansas City, and one of the most successful and longest-running macrobiotic restaurants in North America. From 1981-1991 she supervised macrobiotic cooking education in the central states, and from 1991-1998 she was a main cooking instructor, kitchen supervisor and kitchen apprentice trainer at the Vega Study Center in California in association with Cornellia Aihara. She has been the kitchen coordinator for macrobiotic camps and retreats, including the popular Harvest Moon Retreats and Tall Oaks Camps in the midwest.In 1999 she was the guest cooking instructor at the macrobiotic retreat on Hvar Island, Croatia. In recent years Cynthia has served as a cooking instructor at the Kushi Institute’s annual Summer Conference and the French Meadows Summer Camp. In 2004 she was invited to appear on ABC News to demonstrate macrobiotic cooking.Her cooking instruction is admired for its clarity, patience and gentleness. Cynthia is also highly regarded for her insights into motherhood, advice on macrobiotic pregnancy and delivery, and her earthy and considerate approach to women’s health in general. She is blessed with a natural gift for journeywork healing rooted in her Native American ancestry. An accomplished artist, Cynthia has illustrated books for Avery Publishing Group, Japan Publications, and Contemporary Books, including books by the late Aveline Kushi and other macrobiotic authors. Cindy is currently working on several cookbooks and video home study courses. She is the mother of five active and kind-hearted children, ages 11-24, who care about others, animals, the earth, and looking at the stars at...

David Briscoe

  David Briscoe is one of the most experienced macrobiotic teachers and counselors in the world today. Since 1972 he has gained expertise in every facet of macrobiotics, including personal practice, teaching, counseling, professional cooking, restaurant ownership and center development. In 1975 he was given the honor of being one of the few macrobiotic counseling apprentices to the late macrobiotic master, Noboru Muramoto, author of Healing Ourselves. In 1983 he was among the first to be certified by the Kushi Institute’s premier training program. During the 70’s and 80’s, David established macrobiotic education programs and centers throughout the U.S. He has appeared on national TV programs and radio shows, including the HBO® Special, “Six Months to Live.” He is the co-author of A Personal Peace, contributing author to The Whole Mind and a regular columnist for Macrobiotics Today, the world’s leading macrobiotic magazine. David has developed macrobiotic curriculum and instruction programs for numerous educational organizations, applying his experience as a former secondary school teacher and as a trainer of teachers at the University of Kansas. David is well known for his skilled and personal approach to private macrobiotic counseling. He is highly regarded for his vast experience in the areas of macrobiotic healing diet, home remedies and lifestyle re-balancing, and he is considered one of the leading trainers of macrobiotic counselors and cooking teachers.In 1990 the late macrobiotic master, Herman Aihara, invited David to be his administrative, teaching and counseling associate at The Vega Study Center in California, and from 1991-1998 David worked closely with Herman. After Herman’s passing, David moved on to co-found Macrobiotics America and Macrobiotics Global, the first macrobiotic educational programs to offer multi-media distance learning courses via the internet.David travels and teaches throughout North America and overseas, speaking to medical and lay audiences and as a featured presenter at the major macrobiotic camps and conferences, including The Kushi Institute Summer Conference, French Meadows Summer Camp, The Fall Health Classic, and The Whole World Summer School in Belgium. He has also served as a guest faculty member at the world-famous Kushi Institute in Becket, MA. David holds the honorary position of macrobiotic counselor for The George Ohsawa Macrobiotic Foundation of Chico, CA, the oldest macrobiotic education and publishing organization in North America. David lives in Northen California with his wife, Cynthia, and children, Justin, Nora, Iris, Ana and...

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