Macrobiotics America

David and Cynthia Briscoe
The Leader In Online Macrobiotic Education Since 1999

Acid-Alkaline Rebalancing Tips

Acid-Alkaline Re-Balancing Tips by David Briscoe

Anyone can use the Acid-Alkaline Health re-balancing principles to adjust how they eat to make their meals more nutritious and more balanced. No matter how you prefer to eat, acid-alkaline health principles will support you in identifying missing elements or excesses in your current eating preferences, and it will help you find the balance you desire.
If you eat animal protein as a main food: The important thing is to balance the animal protein and fat with plenty of vegetables and some whole grains. This is the main thing needed. So, if you are satisfied with animal food as a regular food in your diet, consider adding some balancing elements: vegetables (raw and cooked), whole grains such as rice or millet, barley, and plenty of fruit. For the fun of it, why not try a few days per week where you have beans in place of meat, chicken, pork or cheese?

If you are a lacto-ovo vegetarian: Use plenty more vegetables, raw and cooked, and whole grains. See if you can put whole grains at the center of many of your meals with protein from plant sources such as beans, tofu, tempeh comprising your main supplementary source of protein, and much smaller amounts of cheese, dairy and eggs.

If you are vegan: Create an anchor to your eating by placing whole grains at the center supported by vegetables, and place protein-rich vegan foods such as beans, tofu, tempeh, seitan, etc., more to the outside rather than the center. Alkaline-forming soups such as miso soup and seasonings such as unpasteurized miso, soy sauce, unrefined sea salt, shiso powder and sea vegetable powders can add important minerals to a vegan diet. Many vegan diets are destabilized by the regular inclusion of refined sugar. Sugar is almost impossible to balance on a vegan diet.

If you eat raw food exclusively: Get plenty of exercise. For example, do outdoor activities like gardening, walking in the sunshine while breathing fresh country air, and on a regular basis eat some uncooked seaweed such as dulse.


Excess protein, glucose and fat/oil feed the development of cancer cells, microbes, yeast and infections.

The following general guidelines supports healthy nutrition without providing excesses of fat, protein, sugar,

additives and preservatives. Consider adding these foods to your preferred way of eating: